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Comment Archives: Last 30 Days

Re: “Labor Pains

This is ridiculous. ESC members should STRIKE!!!

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by MatthewRN on 07/28/2016 at 2:57 PM

Re: “Labor Pains

This should be in the Press Democrat or somewhere else where more people will read it.

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Jackie on 07/28/2016 at 2:55 PM

Re: “Enough Already

I hesitate to comment in the Bohemian as they have over-edited my comments before but, I sure agree with Padi Selwyn; the current growth rate of permitting more wineries especially in rural neighborhoods needs to be reviewed more carefully. The one big industry in our county has for too long enjoyed the full support of our county supervisors. Their appointees to the planning commission have rubber stamped too many of the projects brought before them.
With a weakened coastal commission, and more investors seeking to put wineries on our coastal hills, we need to Elect a 5th district supervisor not beholden to the big moneyed interests.
Ken Sund

7 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by kensund on 07/28/2016 at 8:02 AM

Re: “Last Stands

Please keep these excellent, detailed, well-researched cover articles on important issues by Will Parrish coming. Our local daily does so little of such serious, old-fashioned journalism

5 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Shepherd Bliss on 07/28/2016 at 6:30 AM

Re: “Enough Already

This rampant over-development by the wine industry impacts not only Sonoma County, but our neighbors in Napa, Mendocino, Lake, and more recently Solano Counties. I enjoy wine and there are certainly many good grape growers and wine makers in our region, to which the wine industry makes important contributions. However, given that wine is a boom-and-bust product, it has become a serious threat to our economy--too many eggs in the same basket. 96% of the veggies and fruit sold in Sonoma County are imported from outside, according to Go Local, which means that we are no longer a food ag county. In terms of food security, this is a dangerous imbalance that must be addressed.

6 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Shepherd Bliss on 07/28/2016 at 6:23 AM

Re: “Last Stands

Rather than controlling sediment discharge from logging that has filled the "core" coho habitat of Elk River, the Regional Water Board voted to let HRC alter the river channel with heavy equipment from the historically deeply incised channel with long deep pools that are deeply shaded by tall riparian forests to a wide flat "V" shaped channel that lacks sheltering vegetation. The plan is to destroy forever the channel that naturally evolved and supported the North Coast's most thriving salmon runs. The Regional Water Board reasoned that the cold water fishery must be sacrificed so that an industrial waste ditch can be built, at taxpayer expense, that is designed to increase logging's pollution load allocation.

Elk River Residents propose low impact management to encourage the channel to incise down through the eight feet of timber sludge that clogs the channel and entombs spawning gravels and rearing pools. We have notified California Fish and Wildlife and requested permits to proceed prior to early rains this fall. Many residents have volunteered to help remove obstructions to flood water conveyance, including landowners whose homes, farms, and orchards are severely and frequently flooded as a result of the obstructions to flow. Please call or write CA Fish and Wildlife and CDF and ask them to implement the low impact methods that residents have requested since 1998, and/or volunteer to help. Funds, and your efforts are desperately needed. Contact ELKRRA or Elk River Residents' Association at: elkrra@gmail.com if you can help.

Residents also propose a restoration forest; one planned to regrow forest cover resembling old growth forest by thinning from below the canopy. The methods are designed to comply with the Timber Production Zoning, but would prioritize the stabilization of the rapidly eroding landscape while sequestering carbon at maximum biological potential. This method is designed to recover the deeply incised channel so important to salmon and residents' continued existence. Forty years of abject regulatory failure to prevent severe cumulative impacts provide no other feasible alternative than a restoration forest.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Jesse Noell on 07/27/2016 at 11:34 PM

Re: “Letters to the Editor: July 27, 2016

I was remembering laughter just fine up to "And, speaking of women, I thought Caitlyn Jenner was actually a man?" We are not a joke, and we are not disguising ourselves to fool anyone. We are who we way we are. This is transphobia, and it's bigotry, whether intentional or not. This has no place on the pages of your nominally progressive rag. This is no more appropriate than racist humor.

7 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Diana on 07/27/2016 at 8:38 PM

Re: “Last Stands

William Ericson,
Yes, the Karuk are a tribe in the Klamath River basin. The Kashia Pomo, as you know, are the indigenous people whose ancestral territory includes the Gualala River watershed. These two peoples are separated by a few hundred miles, as are the logging activities this story describes.
Will

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by Will Parrish 1 on 07/27/2016 at 8:25 PM

Re: “Last Stands

The ''Forest Service'' are the pimps of the Federal Government. They ''service'' industry. They not only sell logging rights, they sell mineral rights, grazing rights and more. Their job is not to protect the forests, but to use them and make money off them. Most of their ''protection'' involves keeping the public away with use fees and closed roads and overpriced campgrounds so you do not see the extent of their pandering. Clear cutting? No problem. If you don;'t think so, go up to the Mount Shasta area and get off road. You'll be appaled. And if you go off road in Oregon or Washington you'll just throw up.

4 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Ed Callaert on 07/27/2016 at 7:23 PM

Re: “Last Stands

Karuk are a tribe from way further north. Do you mean, the Kashia Pomo?

Posted by William Ericson on 07/27/2016 at 4:49 PM

Re: “Labor Pains

It's time for Sonoma County to prioritize its the critical public services provided to the communities most vulnerable and the staff who keep Sonoma County healthy and safe.

Come hear for yourself what is at stake:
North Bay Workers’ Rights Board hearing
Saturday, August 13th, 9:30 am -11:30 am (doors open at 9 am for coffee)
Christ Church United Methodist 1717 Yulupa, Santa Rosa

The event is free, open to the public, and wheelchair accessible.

10 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Betsy20 on 07/27/2016 at 10:53 AM

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