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Comment Archives: stories: News & Features: Features: Last 30 Days

Re: “We Are Family?

i work for CDS the day the doors opened. sold like crazy and they got rid of me and keep a punch of 70-80 year old making 12-14 dollars and hr. and not even a smile on their face. go home and give other people the job who really need it. COSTCO OPEN YOUR EYES AND GET ALL OF THEM OUT OF THERE.If you didnt have samples things would still sell.The demos are just in the way hard to shop

Posted by jane on 04/14/2015 at 5:16 AM

Re: “Hog Heaven

Great Article on the Manglitsa Breed! My son is very interested in this breed as well and talks about them and their benefits often. That's why I thought I would google the Royal Mangalitsa!

Posted by Julie Whittington Herdman on 04/10/2015 at 4:03 PM

Re: “Dish by Dish

Hello! Thank you for your article. I’d like to try to compare it to my previous experience of learning easy Italian lessons through Skype on online classes for free. I did around 10 conversations over Skype with a native speaker from http://preply.com/en/italian-by-skype. And I was pretty satisfied with their Quality. I think they have a strong teaching quality.Following their course curriculum now I can speak Italian like a native,you don't need to go any school. but I Want to try another option.

Posted by Da Rajib on 04/05/2015 at 11:01 AM

Re: “Crop Circles

Bohemian - I expect a higher standard from journalism than I read in this article. The article claims the USDA’s organic standards are “far below” those used in Marin County. The article later claims there are local organic certifications that are beyond the USDA standards. Marin Organic Certified Agriculture program (MOCA) is accredited by the USDA. Organic certification bodies operating under that label in this country and internationally are certifying to the same standards, it is the law.
I am offended by the implication that the entirety of China as a nation is incapable of upholding a standard. The National Organic Program (NOP) reviewed the performance of Chinese certifiers in 2010. Anyone can dial it up on the WWW and read the assessment on their performance. This is the power and the importance of the USDA Organic Program. We can all observe and steward the process of upholding the organic standards; this is something we don’t get in conventional food systems. The Organic movement asked the federal government to oversee organics. In the Organic Food Production Act of 1990, Congress gave the USDA the responsibility of oversight.
The article references a time when 15 years ago farmers said USDA organic was not good enough. A bigger picture is needed to understand this historical reference. The USDA issued a first draft of organic standards that infuriated the organic community because they included allowances for sewage sludge, GMOs and irradiation. The USDA received a flood of comments from the entire community of organic constituents, insisting on the exclusion of the aforementioned methods. The USDA redrafted the standards. This is the power of organics.
We get to know everything that goes on with organic food from seed to table. The article states that the “organic label certifies the method of farming; it is not a verification of the final product”. I’m totally confused by that statement. When a product is labeled organic, a consumer can understand every input or processing allowed in the farming or manufacturing. A farmer’s organic system plan and a manufacturer’s processing and inputs must comply with the organic system. That’s why we have certifiers. I find the transparency of the organic system far superior to what I cannot know in the conventional food system. When the National Organic Standard Board reviews materials allowed in organic systems, I can make a comment to them directly at the meeting. Organics is self auditing, correcting and interactive with constituents. Which food system do you want to support?

19 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by mind33ee on 03/26/2015 at 2:15 PM

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April 22-28, 2015
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